It’s interesting how exploring if something is true or false used to be allowed. We were encouraged to be free thinkers (not the atheist term, but just a general description). YouTube’s banning of content exposing “election fraud or errors” follows many other censorship approaches by Google in recent years. Someone may not be thrilled with certain speech, but that doesn’t give them a right to squelch it.

Per YouTube, its December 9th decision was guided by its “main goal” of “connecting people with authoritative information, while also limiting the reach of

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